Posts Tagged ‘Rh Negative Blood

02
Sep
13

Inter-Species Blood Transfusion

You might have heard about the recent (August 2013) blood transfusion between a cat and a dog which took place in New Zealand.  This is the link to the story as reported by Sky news:  http://news.sky.com/story/1131354/dog-saves-cat-in-rare-blood-transfusion-op

The article begins:

“Macy the Labrador stepped in when Rory the ginger tom became ill after eating rat poison.

“Vet Kate Heller, of Tauranga in New Zealand, said the feeble feline was fading fast and needed an immediate transfusion to survive.

“She searched for a suitable donor cat but could not find one quickly enough.”

The story continues that the Labrador was used as a blood donor and, happily, the cat is doing fine.

What really got my interest were the last three paragraphs of the article:

“Interspecies transfusion, as acts like a dog giving a cat blood are called, has only been successfully carried out a handful of times.

“According to experts, cats do not have antibodies that reject dogs’ blood, so a transfusion may buy enough time for the cat to regenerate its own red blood cells.

“Only one transfusion can be done because a second dose of dog blood would be the death of the cat.”

I couldn’t help but think of the similarity of an Rh- woman giving birth to a Rh+ child.  The first time, there is no problem as there are no antibodies present.  But without Rhogam having been administered, there would be antibodies present during the second pregnancy.

Inter-species.

26
Sep
12

Rh Negative Blood Origins Revisited

A few days ago I received the following comment to a post that I made back on October 29, 2009 regarding possible origins of Rh Negative blood. Within this post I made the statement that Rh Negative blood was believed to have been caused by some sort of mutation that occurred many thousands of years ago. This explanation was by far the most common (and admittedly vague) explanation for the origin of Rh negative blood at the time.

This is the comment I received a few days ago:

“A mutation? I have a bachelor of archaeology (la trobe) so I can shed a little light on this. The O RH – blood type was the most common blood type of the earliest modern human homo sapiens. The blood types AB and RH positive factors were introduced during the Human – Neanderthal divergence period. It is the blood types AB that are foreign to the original modern humans. RH negative is the blood type of the original humans. After statistical analysis of the blood groups of the earliest modern human homo sapien communities they have found Type O RH – negative as the dominant factor. These are communities that predate divergence and were free of neanderthal and other early hominid contamination. Basically concluding that our earliest human ancestors were uncontaminated by the rhesus factor. It is not a reptillian mutation, but the original blood type of the purest human ancestors. It is likely a contributing reason for the O RH – negative blood type being the universal donor.”

More and more sites can be found on the internet today regarding Rh Negative blood as the original blood factor. The following site is extremely interesting:

http://www.aoi.com.au/bcw/neanderbasque.htm

Is the truth to be found on the internet, or are we being fed delibrate mistruths? Whatever the case, this article on the Basques is definitely worth reading.

24
Jul
12

Cloning Rh Negative Blood

If you search the web on “rh negative blood cloning” or some variation thereof, many sites will come up and you’ll find a reference to Rh Negative blood not being able to be cloned.  For the most part, these websites don’t provide a source for that statement. 

In doing that search now in 2012, I’m amazed by the lack of current information.  Most of the articles that do come up are from the 1990’s.  In 1997 sciencenews.org said the following:

http://www.sciencenews.org/sn_arc97/1_11_97/bob1.htm

Any technology that would convert blood to a true universal donor type must take another characteristic, Rh factor, into account. A cell surface protein first discovered in the blood of Rhesus monkeys, the Rh factor can provoke an immune reaction in people whose blood doesn’t normally carry it. People who have the protein on their red blood cells are deemed Rh-positive; those who don’t are Rh-negative.

Rh incompatibility is less of a problem than ABO incompatibility, says Klein. A majority of people in the United States, about 84 percent, have Rh-positive blood.

Moreover, an Rh-negative person can withstand one accidental transfusion of Rh-positive blood because the Rh-negative person doesn’t develop anti-Rh antibodies until 3 or 4 months later, Klein says. “The second transfusion, after they already have that antibody they made as a result of the first transfusion, could be very serious.” An Rh-negative woman who develops antibodies from bearing an Rh-positive child faces that risk if she conceives a second Rh-positive child or receives an Rh-positive blood transfusion.

Several labs have cloned the Rh factor, Goldstein says, but no one fully understands its three-dimensional structure. Therefore, researchers are only beginning to explore techniques for Rh conversion. If researchers can identify which part of the protein stimulates the immune response, then perhaps they can alter that portion to make the blood cell effectively Rh-negative. Eventually they want to produce type O, Rh-negative blood–the kind any person can receive without fear.

So, supposedly, in 1997, Rh positive blood was being cloned but not Rh negative blood.  I can find no information that indicates that in the intervening years Rh negative blood has been successfully cloned.  However, I did find the following fairly recent article about “pharming” or genetically engineered Rh negative blood.  I read into this that pharming is being attempted because Rh negative blood cannot be cloned.  Please see the following taken from the UK’s Daily Mail:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1293361/Scientists-develop-fake-genetically-engineered-blood-use-battlefield.html

“American scientists have developed ‘artificial’ blood that could soon be used to treat wounded soldiers in battle.

The genetically-engineered blood is created by  taking cells from umbilical cords and using a machine to mimic the way bone marrow works to produce mass quantities of usable units of red blood cells.

Known as ‘blood pharming’ the programme was launched in 2008 by the Pentagon’s experimental arm, Darpa, to create blood to treat soldiers in far-flung battlefields.

The firm Arteriocyte, which received $1.95 million for the project, has now sent off its first shipment of O-negative blood to the food and drugs watchdog in the US, the FDA

The blood is made by using hematopoietic cells taken from umbilical cords in a process called ‘pharming’ – using genetically engineered plants or animals to create mass quantities of useful substances.

One umbilical cord can be turned into around 20 units of usable blood. A wounded soldier in the field will require an average of six units during treatment.

Blood cells produced using this method are ‘functionally indistinguishable from red blood cells in healthy circulation’, the company claims.

‘We’re basically mimicking bone marrow in a lab environment,’ Arteriocyte boss Don Brown told Wired magazine.

‘Our model works, but we need to extrapolate our production abilities to make scale.’

If approved it could revolutionise battlefields where a shortage of blood donors can hamper treatment of wounded soldiers.

The process of giving transfusions in war zones is also made more difficult because donated blood has to be transported long distance before it reaches the field hospitals where it is urgently needed

Some blood is already 21 days old before it reaches patients, meaning it only has around a week-long shelf-life before it must be discarded. There are increased risks of infection or organ failure if blood is too old.

Mr Brown said: ‘Until now, the military’s strategy has mainly been contained to basically using stale blood,’

‘And they’ll set up mobile blood banks in a war zone, but even every troop rolling up their sleeve might not be enough when you’ve got a crisis with dozens or more injuries.’

Human trials are not likely until 2013, but the firm predicts the ‘pharmed’ blood could be used by the military within five years if the Pentagon calls for it sooner.

A unit of blood is around a pint and the human body contains between eight and ten pints of blood in total.

Currently, each unit made by Arteriocyte costs $5,000 to produce. If approved, the firm expects to bring this down to around $1,000 per unit by scaling up the production process.

As well as being needed by the military, ‘pharmed’ blood could also be used in hospitals to make up for shortfalls in blood donations if it is approved.

The ‘pharmed’ blood is type O negative which is the most sought after variation because it can be used with any patient, regardless of their own blood type.

Last month the US Red Cross issued an urgent appeal for blood donors to come forward after it said that its supply of O Negative blood was hitting ‘critically low levels.”

If anyone has more info on this subject they’d like to share, please do!  Thanks

 

11
Feb
12

Have You Heard It?

A couple of weeks ago I went outside to feed the birds.  It was early afternoon, the day was clear but windy.  I stepped outside and immediately heard a sound that I had never heard before.  It is hard to describe it.  The best I can do is to say it sounded like a rhythmic, mechanical whooshing sound…whoosh…whoosh…whoosh.  It was relatively loud and seemed to be coming from everwhere. 

I looked up at the sky because I thought maybe an airplane was flying overhead and the wind was somehow pushing the sound of the engine down to earth in waves.  There was no plane in sight.  The sound remained constant for the several minutes I was outside.  I thought that it sounded like what I would imagine a wind turbine sounded like, although I have never actually heard one and there are none near me.

The sound was eerie and unsettling.  I quickly filled up the birdfeeders and went back inside.  I could not hear the sound once inside the house.  As I thought about it more, I thought that it almost sounded like a heart pumping blood…that rhythmic whoosh.

The following week I had a friend over and we went outside briefly and I could hear the same sound but this time it was much lower in volume, but definitely there.  I turned to my friend and asked “Do you hear that?”  He looked at me and said “Hear what?”  I said “That whooshing sound”.  He said he didn’t.  Now that really concerned me because this guy has incredible hearing; he can hear things I can’t.  Why could I hear it and he couldn’t?  Was it an Rh negative thing? 

Two days ago I was reading a blog which mentioned the eerie sounds being heard worldwide.  Well, this got my immediate attention.  What worldwide sounds?  Was it related to what I heard?  I did a search on the internet and sure enought there were reports of strange noises being heard around the world.  You Tube has many videos.  I listened to some but none were similar to what I heard.

Have any of you heard anything similar?  I’d love to hear from you if you have.

23
Jan
12

Rh Negative Team on Etsy

I’m a seller on Etsy and am intrigued by the amazing community on that site.  We support and promote other sellers by creating  “Treasury Lists” which feature 16 items from other sellers.  We join various teams which have a myriad of themes…like the Cat Lovers Team, the Facebook Team,  Vintage Lovers Team,  Needlefelt Team etc.  Many of these teams are very active with members communicating back and forth, sharing new items and treasuries.   It’s really a social network with a buying/selling format.

I thought it might be interesting to see if any Rh negative Etsians would be interested in joining a team of like individuals to share our interests; to see what we have in common (other than blood that is). 

If you’re an Etsy member and interested in joining (you don’t have to be Rh negative, just interested in the topic) please see the following site:

http://www.etsy.com/teams/11615/rh-negative-team

09
Jan
12

If I Hadn’t Seen Them….

The Rh-Negative Registry website has a section on “The Origin Theories of the Rare Rh-Negative Blood Factor”. This is certainly well worth reading and provides thought provoking suggestions. The first on the list is “A Scientific Explanation: Rh-Negatives and CO2” (source: “LawPundint.com”.

It states, in part: “Hence, it would seem to be a likely hypothesis to this observer, presented here for the first time, that Rh- (Rh-negative) developed due to a (presumably beneficial) change mandated in our human breathing of the Earth’s air in the more northerly European latitudes.”

This does seem to be a likely possibility for the Rh-Negative mutation. However, if this is correct, why does the Rh negative mother create antibodies to destroy its Rh positive fetus as if it were a foreign or alien substance? And, even more interestingly, why does the reverse not happen? Why does the Rh positive mother not create antibodies to destroy its Rh Negative fetus? And why can’t Rh negative blood be cloned?

Maybe if I hadn’t seen a UFO myself I would accept this theory as a distinct possibility and not consider it further. However, I did see a UFO with my mother back in the 1960’s. It was very low in the eastern horizon traveling from south to north. It was just a tiny white dot…it looked like a star very far away. As we sat in the garden on the midsummer night, I kept watching that “star”. Was it moving? Minutes passed and I could see that it had moved slightly. I alerted my mother to this object on the horizon and together we watched it slowly move along the horizon to the north. It was now about two-thirds of the way along the horizon and then it stopped. Dead stop. We waited for many minutes just focused on that “star”. What could it be that it could just stop like that? I remember saying “That’s not good…” and then this object made something like a 75 degree turn and started zooming in our direction. That little faint “star” light was rapidly getting brighter and bigger.

We had been focused on that object for almost an hour as it made its slow progression across the horizon. I am certain that the beings controlling this object picked up on our thought waves and were heading toward us. For what reason, I don’t know. If we had stood our ground insteading of running inside I don’t know what would have happened. Sometimes I wish that I had the courage to stay outside and see. But I know I could not…not then, not now.

And so I question and search…

09
Jan
12

Rh Negative Blood – This Lifetime or Many?

This is my first post in a long while.  My WordPress blog had been suspended, but now I’m back!  I apologize to all my followers and am so happy to be back…there is a wealth of information here, especially in all of the comments that have been made over the past few years.  Please read and comment as it is your comments that fuel thought!

I sit here now in a body with Rh negative blood coursing through my veins.  I believe in  reincarnation and I also believe that I chose to be here in this body born into the family and circumstances that I was. 

I was very close to my Rh negative mother.  She was always searching…searching for answers to questions perhaps even unknown to her.  I remember her commenting on a phrase within the Nicene Creed “We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all that is, seen and unseen…”  It was the “unseen” that intrigued her.  She believed that the mind had tremendous power yet untapped by ordinary man.  I was fortunate enough to inherite some of her library on this subject.  And she believed that humans on planet Earth were not the only intelligent life in the cosmos.  It was with my mother that I had my UFO sighting when I was a teenager.  I am a searcher because of my mother.

But did I choose to be born of Rh negative blood in prior lifetimes?  Does it matter?  Is it only significant here and now in this lifetime for some reason?